All posts with the topic: R&D tax credit

Tomorrow’s Budget Speech is likely to have a split personality, being the final Budget of the Con/Lib Coalition Government but also an opportunity for this most political of Chancellors to publicise some of the more electorally attractive policies to be included in the forthcoming Conservative manifesto. This blog post concentrates mainly on the former aspect. … Continue reading Budget March 2015: what are we expecting?

Positive growth forecasts and falling unemployment set a positive tone for this year’s Budget speech, although the Chancellor was frank in his admission that the deficit is still too large. He targeted measures to increase saving, investment, building and exports.  We are reviewing the Budget documents which have now been released and will be blogging … Continue reading Export more. Save more. Invest more. Build more.

As ever, pages of documents have been published backing up the Chancellor’s Budget speech made earlier today.  We are analysing these and will soon be blogging more in depth analysis but in the meantime here are some headline changes: Corporation tax rate to be 20% from April 2015 – this will match the small profits … Continue reading The headline changes….more to come

Previously announced measures in relation to the R&D tax credit and the proposed new Patent Box have been confirmed. The Government intends to introduce an ‘above the line’ R&D tax credit in Finance Bill 2013 to encourage R&D activity by larger companies.  There will be a consultation on the detail but the Government has stated that it … Continue reading Support for innovative industries

In the initial Coalition Agreement of 11 May 2010, the final Coalition Programme released on 20 May 2010 and the Queen’s Speech given on 25 May 2010 (as well as the recent speeches given by George Osborne) a number of initiatives and changes have been proposed by the Government in relation to the tax system, … Continue reading The Coalition Programme – Summary Of Taxation Proposals

It is incredibly disappointing that after months of lobbying from the games industry the Government has rejected our calls for a  tax break to incentivise games development in the UK.  The UK’s position as a world leader has been eroded as other countries such as France and Canada encourage both games companies and our creative talent to relocate with the … Continue reading Games tax credit rejected